Wellington’s Dearest Georgy: The Life and Loves of Lady Georgiana Lennox by Alice Marie Crossland

dearest-georgy

Wellington’s Dearest Georgy: The Life and Loves of Lady Georgiana Lennox written by Alice Marie Crossland, publisher Uniform Press is available NOW in paperback format.

Product Details (as per amazon page)

Using largely unpublished sources, this book tells the story of Lady Georgiana Lennox and the unique friendship she cherished with the Duke of Wellington. She first met the Duke on his return from India when he was serving under Georgy’s father as Chief Secretary. The Lennox family moved to Brussels in 1813 and Georgy’s mother the Duchess of Richmond threw the now legendary ball the night before the Battle of Waterloo. Georgy was a young, beautiful and immensely popular young lady at the time with many suitors. She and the Duke enjoyed a flirtatious early friendship, which blossomed into a true bond between families as the years went by. Georgy had a front row seat to the Battle of Waterloo, and remained in Brussels after the battle to help tend to the wounded. At 29 she married the future 23rd Baron de Ros who became a diplomatic spy, and later Governor of the Tower of London. Georgy had three children, and died at the impressive age of 96.

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Now and again I like to read a book that takes me out of my comfort zone. I do love historical fiction but have not read a historical biography before. As soon as I read the synopsis of Dearest Georgy summarising Georgy’s friendship with the Duke of Wellington and that she had witnessed such a pivotal moment in history I knew there was much to learn about this lady that lived to such a grand age.

The author, Alice Marie Crossland, has done extensive research with reference to numerous footnotes to support her words. The book is also filled with wonderful illustrations which brings the story and its real life characters to life.

Georgiana Lennox was born into aristocracy, one of 14 children to the Duke and Duchess of Richmond. It was the early 18 hundreds, a time when young ladies were introduced to society and families searched for a good, wealthy pedigree for their daughter’s to marry.

Georgy, as she was fondly known by the Duke of Wellington, had an almost precious relationship with the Duke. The dramatic scenes unfolding at the ball before the Battle of Waterloo were quite poignant. Scenes of joviality were dramatically left with ladies feeling quite bereft from the sudden absence of men.

Georgy’s life experienced many tragedies from this date on. Tragedy and uncertainty of war, separation from loved ones, terrible illnesses, death. She had moved from London, Ireland, Brussels and back. Visits to Paris also. The travelling must have been horrific, I can’t imagine moving a family of fourteen children to another country by ship then by cart. Long, very cold journeys that must have felt never ending.

When Georgy did find a husband it was so humbling to read of this side of her. Moving from lavish surroundings to a more meagre accommodation. Georgy took it in her stride and embraced this new chapter of her life.

A very informative and interesting read about a remarkable young woman growing up experiencing and living through many pivotal historical times. A story of long lasting friendship and of a love that was so strong facing many turbulent times but equally many enjoyable memorable scenes. Evoking and dramatic and deeply moving. I would love to see Georgy’s story on the big screen.

To find out more about Alice Marie Crossland and her work please visit the following pages:

Twitter:  http://www.twitter.com/amcrossland1

Website:  http://www.alicemariecrossland.com/

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