When I Come Home Again by Caroline Scott @CScottBooks @simonschusterUK @RandomTTours #WhenIComeHomeAgain #bookextract

When I Come Home Again written by Caroline Scott, publisher Simon & Schuster UK, is available NOW in ebook, audiobook and hardcover format.

Book Blurb

They need him to remember. He wants to forget.

1918. 
In the last week of the First World War, a uniformed soldier is arrested in Durham Cathedral. When questioned, it becomes clear he has no memory of who he is or how he came to be there.

The soldier is given the name Adam and transferred to a rehabilitation home. His doctor James is determined to recover who this man once was. But Adam doesn’t want to remember. Unwilling to relive the trauma of war, Adam has locked his memory away, seemingly for good.

When a newspaper publishes a feature about Adam, three women come forward, each claiming that he is someone she lost in the war. But does he believe any of these women? Or is there another family out there waiting for him to come home?

Based on true events, When I Come Home Again is a deeply moving and powerful story of a nation’s outpouring of grief, and the search for hope in the aftermath of war.

To buy link:

https://uk.bookshop.org/books/when-i-come-home-again-a-beautiful-and-heartbreaking-wwi-novel-based-on-true-events/9781471192173

I am so pleased to be involved in the blogtour celebrating and promoting the launch of Caroline Scott’s latest novel: When I Come Home Again. I have the pleasure of sharing an extract with you.

Chapter two extract

‘Name:                   ’

The hairs rise on his forearm and he hugs his knees to his chest. It is cold in the cell. They have taken his clothes away and he feels every breath of air from the window above. His naked body is familiar to him and yet not. He knows his own hands, but he can’t remember the scars on his arms, or the lice bites that cover his body. He scratches the backs of his knees and sees that there is blood on his fingers.

Your name, they said. We need a name. We can’t start without it. You need to give us your name.

It comes back at him again, that insistent question. All through the night. No starting, but no stopping. He would have told them, if he could.

The walls of the cell are blistered with damp. The plaster ripples and glistens. The walls are as pockmarked as his skin and the whitewash comes away on his shoulder when he leans against it. There are scales of lime in the creases of his hands and chalk down his fingernails. Five white condemning crescents. It is the chalk that has put him in this police cell.

Where’s your identity disc? they asked. Your pay book? Your service number?

Looking at the new bruise blooming on his arm makes him ashamed. The constable had walked him through the town with his arms in a grip. It wasn’t so much that it hurt, but he had felt humiliated when the people’s eyes flicked towards him and then away, and chastened by the words that they mouthed. He wanted to tell them that he’d done nothing wrong. He wanted to shout it out. He wanted to tell them that this wasn’t him.

What’s your battalion? What regiment? Where are you stationed?

They had emptied his pockets while the sergeant questioned him. Every item was catalogued and inspected. Every coin was turned over. Every pebble. Every piece of chalk. This scrutiny made him feel as though his pencil stub and box of matches were specimens in a museum requiring labels. But what should their labels be? Could these innocent items condemn him? They told him that they were taking his belt away so that he wouldn’t hang himself.

He watches the silverfish scurry. There are cobwebs in the corners and chains on the wall of the cell. They are crumbling, rusting old chains, the kind prisoners have in storybook dungeons, and he suspects they are there more for warning than purpose. He hears the spyhole in the door click again. They have been doing this all night; coming to look at him, checking on him. Why did they imagine that he might hang himself?

Home address? You must have a home address. You must have come from somewhere.

He tries to remember. He genuinely tries. He recalls the barns and sheds and ditches of the past few weeks, but nothing before that. He slept on a bench in a church porch some days ago. An old woman handed him a bowl of warm milk in the morning. A young cleric gave him a blanket that smelled of laundry soap. He tries to remember what home feels like, what it smells like. It smells of damp and disinfectant and urine in this cell, and the sweat on his own skin.

Place of birth? Date of birth?

‘Born to raise the sons of earth,’ the voice in the next cell crescendos. ‘Born to give them second birth.’ It’s Christmas carols now. The disembodied voice has been singing hymns all night; eight hours of rhyming trials and tribulations, mysteries and mercies, and green hills far away.

It was a desecration of a place of worship, they told him. It was a serious offence. He’d laughed when they said that this was the sort of filthy thing the Germans had done in France.

They told him it didn’t help his case that he laughed. They asked him why he did it. What was he thinking? What made him want to do such a thing? He could only reply that he didn’t know.

Next of kin?

Nothing. He apologized. He could see their frustration. He didn’t want to frustrate them. It wouldn’t do him any good, the sergeant said, if he didn’t speak up, if he didn’t cooperate. He would have to go back to his regiment, they said. The authorities would need to be informed. Was he home on leave, they wanted to know. Was he due back with his battalion? Had he gone absent?

What were you thinking, lad? they asked. Are you a deserter?

The electric bulb buzzes and casts a cold white light. It has been left on all night, the moths dancing foolishly around it. He picks them up off the floor now and they crumble to dust between his fingers.

The sergeant had brought him a tin mug of tea, bread and butter and a jug of hot water. He’d told him that he should wash. That he stank. When he put his hands to his face he realized that he hadn’t shaved for several days. He can’t remember his own reflection. He felt the new shape of his face with his wet fingers. The sergeant had leaned against the wall as he watched him wash. He said that he lost his son to the war last year. That Colin was a good boy. That his mother wouldn’t ever get over it. There were dark shadows under the man’s eyes.

Where’s your mother, lad? Does she know where you are? Don’t you want to be a good boy for your mother?

They showed him the charge sheet, turned it round to face him, the empty white spaces that ought to be filled. Where he ought to have a date and place of birth. Where he ought to have a residence. A next of kin. A name. The inspector’s finger jabbed at the paper.

What are you called? he asked it again. They keep on asking it. What’s your fucking name?

About the Author
Caroline completed a PhD in History at the University of Durham. She developed a particular interest in the impact of the First World War on the landscape of Belgium and France, and in the experience of women during the conflict – fascinations that she was able to pursue while she spent several years working as a researcher for a Belgian company. Caroline is originally from Lancashire, but now lives in southwest France. The Photographer of the Lost was a BBC Radio 2 Book Club pick.

Twitter: @CScottBooks

Blooms of War by Suzanne Tierney @notajaxgirl #blogtour #bookexcerpt

Blooms pf War Cover BoW_1600

Blooms of War written and self-published by Suzanne Tierney is available NOW in ebook, kindleunlimited and paperback format.

Book Blurb

In war, she fell in love.

Vera Betts shouldn’t be falling in love with the enigmatic doctor she suspects of espionage. Reeling from her family’s betrayal, she’s faked her nursing credentials, invented a new name, and run away to the frontlines of the French battlefield. Four years into the Great War and she knows who she is and what she’s meant for—to save the living and sit vigil by the dying. When the cagey-yet-earnest Dr. Nicholas Wallace arrives, so do mysterious explosions destroying hospitals. Even as Nick raises her suspicions, he lowers her defenses. He wants the war to end. Are his acts of sabotage politically motivated or a desperate attempt at peace?

In peace, she fell apart.

A year later, Vera is back with her oppressive family, living under her real name, and Nick is on trial for murder. Trapped in grief and guilt, she cannot speak about the past and does not believe in the future. With Nick refusing to defend himself, she ventures to London to understand why he is so willing to embrace the hangman’s noose. Who is he trying to protect? What secrets does he plan to carry to his grave? And why does Nick insist upon hiding her true identity? To save the man she loves, Vera must tear open the past and confront the tragic price for peace.

Purchase Links

UK – https://www.amazon.co.uk/Blooms-War-Evocative-Emotional-Story-ebook/dp/B08CY87LW9/

US – https://www.amazon.com/Blooms-War-Evocative-Emotional-Story-ebook/dp/B08CY87LW9/

Blooms of War Full Tour Banner

I am so pleased to be involved in the blogtour celebrating and promoting the launch of Suzanne Tierney’s latest novel: Blooms of War.  I have the pleasure of sharing an excerpt from the novel.

Blooms of War

Chapter Eight

Wimereux, May 15, 1918

[Vera and Nick meet by chance at the beach and engage in their first flirt. A letter slips from Vera’s pocket and the wind picks it up, scattering it about. The two chase down the pages, turning the capture of the pages into a game.]

*    *     *

He and I kick up our pace. My skirt shortens the length of my stride. I grab a handful of fabric, bunch it above my knees.

“No fair,” decries Colonel Wallace, giving my legs an exaggerated ogle.

We keep running and both leap, trying to grasp the stubbornly airborne page, and end up colliding into each other. Midair, his arm goes around my waist, my arms around his neck, and when we tumble, we do so like lovers falling from the sky. We land, a soft thud on soft sand, and he’s careful to release me, letting me roll off of his arm like I am too precious to tether. I lay back, squint up at the baby blue sky. Something vibrant and alive forms a ball in my stomach, flares through me and bursts out.

Laughter.

I love the sound of this novel, one to definitely add to my TBR

Author Bio –

Writer of lush, historical happily-ever-after tales, Suzanne Tierney believes in true love. But she takes delicious pleasure in making her characters fight, flutter, and find their way to each other. Her books have won numerous awards and she has twice been a Golden Heart Finalist® with the Romance Writers of America.

Suzanne grew up in Oregon, adulted in the San Francisco Bay Area, and somehow ended up in Florida, where she is very much a cold-water fish learning to navigate humid, salty seas. She loves chatting with readers.

Social Media Links –

Instagram: @notajaxgirl

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/notajaxgirl/?modal=admin_todo_tour

Twitter: @notajaxgirl

Website: suzannetierney.com

Giveaway – 3 Winners each win a Donation of $15 to designated winner’s choice of frontline healthcare worker organization in the name of the  designated winner – for example it could be the American  Red Cross; etc. (Open INT)

*Terms and Conditions –Worldwide entries welcome.  Please enter using the Rafflecopter box below.  The winner will be selected at random via Rafflecopter from all valid entries and will be notified by Twitter and/or email. If no response is received within 7 days then Rachel’s Random Resources reserves the right to select an alternative winner. Open to all entrants aged 18 or over.  Any personal data given as part of the competition entry is used for this purpose only and will not be shared with third parties, with the exception of the winners’ information. This will passed to the giveaway organiser and used only for fulfilment of the prize, after which time Rachel’s Random Resources will delete the data.  I am not responsible for despatch or delivery of the prize.

http://www.rafflecopter.com/rafl/display/33c69494385/

 

 

 

 

The Name Beneath The Stone: Secret of the Unknown Warrior by Robert Newcome @NewcomeRobert @UnicornPubGroup @Bookollective #HistFic #Remembrance #UnknownWarrior

the name beneath the stone

The Name Beneath The Stone written by Robert Newcome, publisher Universe (Unicorn Publishing Group), is available NOW in ebook and paperback format.

To buy link: https://amzn.to/32OAmCR

Book Blurb

Three generations, one family, connected by an historic secret. 1917 Private Daniel Dawkins fights at Messines Ridge and Passchendaele. He writes home to his true-love Joyce, but reveals little of his extreme bravery, his kindness, his loyalty to his comrades and the horrors they experience on the Western Front. 1920 Captain Peter Harding is tasked with a secret mission to assist in the selection of a body dug up from the battlefields of Flanders to be buried in Westminster Abbey as the ‘Unknown Warrior’. Events take place on that expedition that come to haunt him for the rest of his life. 2011 Sarah Harding discovers Daniel s letters and Peter s diaries. Together with historian James Marchant she pieces together the hidden truth behind the Tomb of the Unknown Warrior and must decide what to do with it. Values are challenged and characters are tested in this gripping novel which asks what if the identity of the Unknown Soldier was discovered – and should that secret ever be revealed?

a-name-beneath-the-stone-poster

I voluntarily reviewed an arc of this book. All opinions are my own and no content may be copied. However, authors and publishers may use elements of my reviews for quotes.

I feel honoured to be involved in the blogtour celebrating and promoting the launch of Robert Newcome’s debut novel: The Name Beneath The Stone.

The Name Beneath The Stone is a remarkable story that’s insightful, thought provoking, poignant filled with raw, authentic images and scenes.  I was completely enthralled by the story and the book is very current with many countries taking time to remember and never forget the fallen heroes from all hostilities with Remembrance Day on the 11th November.

Robert Newcome has taken hold of a fact from 1916 and a pivotal moment in the world’s history of wartime remembrance and he has cleverly woven this fact with fiction.  He has created a brilliant historical time-slip novel that spans almost a hundred years.  I have found often that I’ve been ignited by history through fictional novels based around certain historical events and I would highly recommend picking up a historical fictional novel to gain a thirst for history.

This is the story of three lives: it’s 1917 and we have Private Daniel Dawkins fighting at Messines Ridge and Passchendaele.  In 1920 Captain Peter Harding was issued with a top secret mission to dig up the body of an unknown warrior to be brought back to London to be buried in Westminster Abbey.  In 2011 Sarah Harding, the granddaughter to Peter Harding, discovers personal letters and diaries dating back to WWI.  These three individuals hold a link to each other and Sarah with the help of a historian delve deeper in uncovering what becomes an astonishing chain of events that was equally riveting and so very poignant.

Private Daniel Dawkins was confident in his role as a soldier he was brave, he supported his colleagues and had a knack of understanding wartime strategies.  Daniel had had a very difficult upbringing so being in the thick of things in the war fields felt almost calm like compared to his past.  Daniel had a sweetheart back home in the UK and when his relationship became more serious his feelings towards the intensity of the warzone changed and he held a different perspective for the future.

A few years after the war had ended and peace was declared Captain Peter Harding was sworn to secrecy with a mission that felt overwhelming for any man.  However, this was only the start for Peter for what was to become a lifelong struggle with something that would play on Peter’s mind since the eventful day back in 1920.

When Sarah Harding discovers the wartime notes dating back to WWI and tries to ask her ailing father the significance of them she is left with more questions than answers.  What follows is a mystery of her own heritage and how it may hold a vital role in the commemorative stone of the Unknown Warrior at Westminster Abbey.

I was totally transfixed by this fictional story based on a remarkable event in history.  The author, Robert Newcome, did not spare us any details and we witness the raw reality of war.  The story was gripping, authentic and absorbing and the ending left me with shivers of emotion and with a whole heap of desire to know more.

About the Author

the name beneath the stone robert newcomeAfter five years serving as an officer in The Light Infantry, Robert studied Political Philosophy at Exeter University. Following this he had various management positions in the John Lewis Partnership, finally running management training. He then spent a number of years working for management consultants before setting up his own business with a colleague in 2007. Throughout this period he was writing articles, short stories and novels in his spare time.

Robert has just joined Twitter @NewcomeRobert

The Stars in the Night by Clare Rhoden @ClareER @rararesources #blogtour #bookreview #WWIfiction #HistFic #giveaway

 

the stars in the night

The Stars in the Night written by Clare Rhoden, publisher Odyssey Books, is available NOW in ebook and paperback format.

To buy links: https://amzn.to/2DwD71S

https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-stars-in-the-night-clare-rhoden/1130076728

http://odysseybooks.com.au/titles/the-stars-in-the-night-new/

Book Blurb

Harry Fletcher is a confident young man, sure that he will marry Nora, no matter what their families say. He will always protect Eddie, the boy his father saved from the gutters of Port Adelaide.
Only the War to End All Wars might get in the way of Harry’s plans…
From the beaches of Semaphore to the shores of Gallipoli, the mud of Flanders to the red dust of inland South Australia, this is a story of love, brotherhood, and resilience.

Stars in the Night Full Tour Banner

I voluntarily reviewed an arc of this book. All opinions are my own and no content may be copied. However, authors and publishers may use elements of my reviews for quotes

I am so pleased to be involved in the blogtour celebrating and promoting the launch of Clare Rhoden’s latest novel: The Stars in the Night.  Firstly, I’d like to say I love the play on words for the title, you have to read the book to understand what I mean.

The Stars in the Night was such an insightful historical timeslip novel that deeply moved me.  The author Clare Rhoden’s words of life living within the stench, the noise and the darkness of war felt very real to me.  I could sense the urgency, the fear, the brothers in arms camaraderie but I could also feel the sudden rush of love for the letters from home and also for the simple things in life that we take for granted.

This is a story that starts off in Australia in the 1970’s when Kate is helping her Grandfather Harry clear out her late Grandmother Nora’s personal belongings following her death.  Discovering a pile of letters written by Harry to Nora during his conscription and also a notebook written by her late Great Uncle the author then takes us back in time to 1917 to when Harry and his brother Eddie joined up.

The story continues following the days that led to weeks, months and years following the war from Australia to Egypt to Europe and Passchendaele and France.

This is a fictional story based on real life facts of the true horrors of war but it is also a story of love and of loss.  The loss of comrades and also of the loss of life as it was before war ravaged countries and lives.

The Stars in the Night is a story that was hauntingly beautiful but so tragic at times.  It was a story that fascinated me and evoked many emotions.  I appreciate how authors research historical moments in time and bring them to life with fiction.

About the Author

Stars in the Night - ClareRhodenClare Rhoden writes historical fiction, sci-fi and fantasy (check her titles at Odyssey Books http://odysseybooks.com.au/). Clare lives in Melbourne Australia with her husband Bill, their super-intelligent poodle-cross Aeryn, a huge and charming parliament of visiting magpies, and a very demanding/addictive garden space.
Clare completed her PhD in Australian WWI literature at the University of Melbourne in 2011, and a Masters of Creative Writing in 2008, in which she investigated the history of her grandparents who emigrated for Europe to Port Adelaide in January 1914. The Stars in the Night is the result of her research.

Social Media Links
Website: https://clarerhoden.com/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/clareelizabethrhoden/
Instagram: @clarerhodenauthor
Twitter: @ClareER

hdrplGiveaway to Win a signed copy of The Stars in the Night, a metal poppy brooch made by a Melbourne craftswoman, and a cross-stitch poppy card. (Open Internationally)
*Terms and Conditions –Worldwide entries welcome. Please enter using the Rafflecopter box below. The winner will be selected at random via Rafflecopter from all valid entries and will be notified by Twitter and/or email. If no response is received within 7 days then Rachel’s Random Resources reserves the right to select an alternative winner. Open to all entrants aged 18 or over. Any personal data given as part of the competition entry is used for this purpose only and will not be shared with third parties, with the exception of the winners’ information. This will passed to the giveaway organiser and used only for fulfilment of the prize, after which time Rachel’s Random Resources will delete the data. I am not responsible for despatch or delivery of the prize.

http://www.rafflecopter.com/rafl/display/33c69494214/

 

 

The Glorious Dead by Tim Atkinson blogtour book review

 

The Glorious Dead Cover

The Glorious Dead written by Tim Atkinson, publisher Unbound, is available NOW in ebook and hardcover format.

To buy link:  Waterstones – https://bit.ly/2yWylID

Amazon UK – https://amzn.to/2SK1E9H

Product Details

What happened when the Great War ended and the guns stopped firing? Who cleared the battlefields and buried the dead? It’s 1918 and the war may be over but Lance-Corporal Jack Patterson and the men of his platoon are still knee-deep in Flanders mud, searching the battlefields for the remains of comrades killed in action. But duty isn’t all that’s keeping Jack in Flanders. For one there is Katia, the daughter of a local publican, with whom he has struck up a romance. And then there is something else, a secret that lies buried in Jack’s past, one he hopes isn’t about to be dug up…

The Glorious Dead Blog Tour Poster

I voluntarily reviewed an arc of this book. All opinions are my own and no content may be copied. However, authors and publishers may use elements of my reviews for quotes.

I am so pleased to be involved in the blogtour celebrating and promoting the launch of Tim Atkinson’s novel: The Glorious Dead.

In August this year I felt very privileged to go on a visit to Flanders Field, near Ypres, Belgium.  Flanders Field was a major battle site during the First World War 1914-1918 and now it is home to many WWI War Cemeteries, Commemorative monuments and historical areas of interest.  I visited many of the war grave cemeteries including Essex Farm and Tyne Cot and the whole visit completely moved me.  When I was invited to read and review this novel by Tim Atkinson I had no hesitation in accepting.

The author, Tim Atkinson, has undertaken vast research with this book which is based on fact surrounding the men who had been employed by the War Graves Commission.  Men that had witnessed the daily grind of war, a war that had taken the lives of so many of their comrades but had spared them to now search the land to find the remains of the men who had lost their lives, to identify them in order for them to be reburied with dignity at one of the many war graves in an around Ypres.

Reading through the pages of The Glorious Dead I felt like I was reliving my visit to the cemeteries but this time I was visiting back in 1918.  Tim Atkinson has written a raw, honest interpretation of a time back in 1918 and 1919 to a task that was so brutally painful and gritty and was also very dangerous with the debris of ammunitions still lying around.  Interspersed between the horrors of the remains of the war Tim Atkinson has woven humour, camaraderie and romance within the storyline.  At times the story is very difficult to read and you are wracked with emotion but these glimpses of humanity and life still going on give the story hints of warmth.

I was completely enthralled by this novel, it was very poignant with it’s raw account of events, it had touches of mystery and of unjust.  You could feel a sense of belonging to the time and to the place and you could also understand why so many men and women found life very difficult after the war.  A story of war that is not always told.

I’d like to share a quote from the novel which particularly resonated with me:

lives made heavy by the weight of Flanders mud that still sticks to them like clay.

About the Author

Tim Atkinson Author PictureTim Atkinson is a teacher, author and award-winning blogger. He studied philosophy at the University of Hull and has worked variously as a filing clerk, lay-clerk, chain-man and school teacher. He was born in Colchester, brought up in Yorkshire and now lives in Lincolnshire.

 

Website:  https://www.timatkinson.info/

Twitter:  http://www.twitter.com/dotterel

I’d also like to share a few of the photos I took during my visit to Flanders Fields in the summer.

 

 

 

The Poppy Field by Deborah Carr blogtour book review

 

The Poppy Field Cover

The Poppy Field written by Deborah Carr, publisher HarperImpulse, is available NOW in ebook format and is due to be published in paperback at the end of December.

To buy/pre-order link: https://amzn.to/2PBccWF

Product Details

This year marks the 100th anniversary of the end of the First World War.
Young nurse, Gemma, is struggling with the traumas she has witnessed through her job in the NHS. Needing to escape from it all, Gemma agrees to help renovate a rundown farmhouse in Doullens, France, a town near the Somme. There, in a boarded-up cupboard, wrapped in old newspapers, is a tin that reveals the secret letters and heartache of Alice Le Breton, a young volunteer nurse who worked in a casualty clearing station near the front line.
Set in the present day and during the horrifying years of the war, both woman discover deep down the strength and courage to carry on in even the most difficult of times. Through Alice’s words and her unfailing love for her sweetheart at the front, Gemma learns to truly live again.

This is a beautifully written epic historical novel that will take your breath away.

The Poppy Field Full Tour Banner

I voluntarily reviewed an arc of this book. All opinions are my own and no content may be copied. However, authors and publishers may use elements of my reviews for quotes.

I am so pleased to be involved in the blogtour celebrating and promoting the launch of Deborah Carr’s latest novel: The Poppy Field.

This is my first introduction to the work of Deborah Carr and it ticked all the boxes for me.  I love reading historical fiction and especially stories set around pivotal moments in history, events that changed the world we live in now.  2018 marks the 100th anniversary of the end of the First World War.  During the summer I had the privilege to visit many of the war graves and commemorative monuments around Flanders Field.  I was deeply moved by the graves and the traces of a war that etched scars across the country.  My husband was a member of the armed forces and I could totally emphasise with the families and loved ones that were left behind during times of conflict.  The constant fear of the unknown was a daily battle.

The story is set in two time zones; the present day and then we travel back to 1917.  Gemma has recently left her nursing job back in the UK following a very emotional break-up.  She has agreed to help oversee the renovation of an old farmhouse that has been left to her father.  The farmhouse is in Doullens, France, not far from the Somme.  A chance to escape her life in Brighton proves to be the best medicine for Gemma.

The farmhouse is pretty derelict and Gemma has quite a job on her hands but with the help of a fellow Brit living in the French village they start the task of renovating the property.  An unexpected find is made in one of the outhouses; a tin box full of letters dating back to 1917.  Curiosity peaks Gemma’s attention with these letters and she is keen to learn about the author and recipient of them.  Gemma slowly learns from the letters the emotional, brave plight of Alice Le Breton, a young VAD (Voluntary Aid Detachment) originally from Jersey who worked in a casualty clearing station near the frontline in Northern France.

I was captivated by the scenes the author portrayed back in 1917: it was atmospheric and you could feel the bravado from these young volunteer girls witnessing scenes they never could have imagined.  The days in the makeshift wards were relentless and there was little escape for the VADs.  Gemma felt a kinship with Alice, they were both nurses working under extreme pressure and conditions so for Gemma to learn of Alice 100 years on must have really brought to home the differences in life in medicine back then and now.

Deborah Carr’s novel was very raw and honest at times revealing war in it’s true colours.  Alice’s story must have been very similar to many back in WWI.  Love finds a way during the dark days of conflict bringing glimpses of hope for the future.  These moments must have been cherished by many.  I adored both sides of this story, the present day with Gemma overcoming her heartache and finding inspiration in the farm and letters and to Alice’s story that was just so tragically beautiful.  Heart-breaking and utterly captivating.

About the Author

The Poppy Field - Deborah MedDeborah Carr lives on the island of Jersey in the Channel Islands with her husband, two children and three rescue dogs. She became interested in books set in WW1 when researching her great-grandfather’s time as a cavalryman in the 17th 21st Lancers.
She is part of ‘The Blonde Plotters’ writing group and was Deputy Editor on the online review site, Novelicious.com for seven years. Her debut historical romance, Broken Faces, is set in WW1 and was runner-up in the 2012 Good Housekeeping Novel Writing Competition and given a ‘special commendation’ in the Harry Bowling Prize that year. The Poppy Field is her second historical novel.

Social Media Links
Website: https://www.deborahcarr.org/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DeborahCarrAuthor/
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/DebsCarr
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ofbooksandbeaches/
Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/deborahcarr/